1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... 42

Vygotsky’s Educational Theory in Cultural Context - bet 14

bet14/42
Sana15.06.2018
Hajmi4.21 Mb.

References

Arievitch, I. M., & Stetsenko, A. (2000). The quality of cultural tools and cognitive

development: Gal’perin’s perspective and its implications. Human Development, 43, 69–92.

Bjorklund, D. F. (1997). In search of a metatheory for cognitive development

(or, Piaget is dead and I don’t feel so good myself). Child Development, 68(1),

144–148.


Bodrova, E., & Leong, D. J. (1996). Tools of the mind: The Vygotskian approach to early childhood education. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss : Vol. 1. Attachment. New York: Basic Books.

Bozhovich, L. I. (1968). Lichnost i ee formirovanie v detskom vozraste [Personality and

its development in childhood]. Moscow: Prosveschenie.

Bruer, J. T. (1993). Schools for thought: A science of learning in the classroom. Cambridge,

MA: MITPress.

Buss, A. H., & Plomin, R. (1975). A temperament theory of personality development.

New York: Wiley.

Cole, M., & Cole, S. (1993). The development of children. New York: Scientific American

Books.


Davydov, V. V. (1986). Problemy razvivayuschego obucheniya [Problems of

development-generating learning]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Davydov, V. V. (1990). Types of generalization in instruction. Reston, VA: National

Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Davydov, V. V. (1998). The concept of developmental teaching. Journal of Russian and East European Psychology, 36(4), 11–36.

Davydov, V. V. (1999). What is real learning activity? In M. Hedegaard &

J. Lompscher (Eds.), Learning activity and development (pp. 123–138). Aarhus,

Denmark: Aarhus University Press.

Dubrovina, I. V. (1987). Formirovanie lichnosti v perekhodnyi period ot podrostcovogo k iunoshkeskomu vozrastu [Development of personality during the transitional

period from adolescence to adulthood]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Elkonin, D. B. (1972). Toward the problem of stages in the mental development of

the child. Soviet Psychology, 10 , 225–251.

Elkonin, D. B. (1978). Psikhologiya igry [Psychology of play]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Elkonin, D. B. (1989). Izbrannye psikhologicheskie trudy [Selected psychological

works]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Elkonin, D. B., & Dragunova, T. V. (Eds.) (1967). Vozrastnye i individualnye osobennosti

mladshikh podrostkov [Age-dependent and individual characteristics of young

adolescents]. Moscow: Prosveschenie.

Galperin, P. Y. (1989). Organization of mental activity and the effectiveness of learn-

ing. Soviet Psychology, 27(3), 65–82.

Kistyakovskaya, M. U. (1970). Razvitie dvizheniay u detei pervogo goda zhizni [The

development of motor skills in infants]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Lekhtman-Abramovich, R. Ya., & Fradkina, F. I. (1949). Etapy razvitiya igry i deistviy s predmetami v rannem vozraste [Stages of development of play and manipulation

of objects in early childhood]. Moscow: Medgiz.

Leontiev, A. N. (1964). Problems of mental development. Washington, DC: US Joint

Publication Research Service.



154 Yuriy V. Karpov

Leontiev, A. N. (1978). Activity, consciousness, and personality. Englewood Cliffs,

NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Leontiev, A. N. (1981). The problem of activity in psychology. In J. V. Wertsch (Ed.),

The concept of activity in Soviet psychology (pp. 37–71). Armonk, NY: Sharpe.

Leontiev, A. N., & Luria, A. R. (1968). The psychological ideas of L. S. Vygotskii.

In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), Historical roots of contemporary psychology (pp. 338–367).

New York: Harper & Row.

Lisina, M. I. (Ed.) (1985). Obschenie i rech: Razvitie rechi u detei v obschenii so vzroslymi

[Communication and speech: The development of children’s speech in the course

of communication with adults]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Lisina, M. I. (1986). Problemy ontogeneza obscheniya [Problems of the ontogenesis of

communication]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Luria, A. R. (1961). The role of speech in the regulation of normal and abnormal behavior.

Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Luria, A. R. (1976). Cognitive development: Its cultural and social foundations.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Piaget, J. (1971). The theory of stages in cognitive development. In D. R. Green,

M. P. Ford, & G. B. Flamer (Eds.), Measurement and Piaget (pp. 1–11). New York:

McGraw-Hill.

Plomin, R., & DeFries, J. C. (1980). Genetics and intelligence: Recent data. Intelli- gence, 4, 15–24.

Rogoff, B., & Chavajay, P. (1995). What’s become of research on the cultural basis

of cognitive development? American Psychologist, 50(10), 859–877.

Rozengard-Pupko, G. L. (1948). Rech i razvitie vospriyatiya v rannem vozraste

[Language and the development of perception in early age]. Moscow: AMN

Publisher.

Scarr, S. (1992). Developmental theories for the 1990s: Development and individual

differences. Child Development, 63, 1–19.

Segall, M. H., Dasen, P. R., Berry, J. W., & Poortinga, Y. (1990). Human behavior in global perspective. New York: Pergamon.

Slavina, L. S. (1948). O razvitii motivov igrovoi deayatelnosti v doshkolnom

vozraste [On the development of play motives at preschool age]. Izvestiya APN RSFSR, 14, 11–29.

Talyzina, N. F. (1981). The psychology of learning. Moscow: Progress.

Tomasello, M. (1999). The cultural origins of human cognition. Cambridge, MA:

Harvard University Press.

Usova, A. P. (1976). Rol igry v vospitanii detei [The role of play in children’s upbring-

ing]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1976). Play and its role in the mental development of the child. In

J. S. Bruner, A. Jolly, & K. Sylva (Eds.), Play: Its role in development and evolution

(pp. 537–554). New York: Basic Books.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). M. Cole, V. John-Steiner, S. Scribner & E. Souberman (Eds.),

Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA:

Harvard University Press.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1986). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MITPress.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1987). R. W. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky: Vol. 1:

Problems of general psychology. New York: Plenum.

Development Through the Lifespan

155


Vygotsky, L. S. (1997). R. W. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky: Vol. 4: The history of the development of higher mental functions. New York: Plenum.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1998). R. W. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky, Vol. 5:

Child psychology. New York: Plenum.

Wertsch, J. V., & Tulviste, P. (1992). L. S. Vygotsky and contemporary developmental

psychology. Developmental Psychology, 28(4), 548–557.

Zaporozhets, A. V. (1997). Principal problems in the ontogeny of the mind. Journal

of Russian and East European Psychology, 35(1), 53–94.

Zaporozhets, A. V., & Elkonin, D. B. (Eds.) (1971). The psychology of preschool children.

Cambridge, MA: MITPress.

Zaporozhets, A. V., & Lisina, M. I. (Eds.). (1974). Razvitie obscheniya u doshkolnikov

[The development of communication in preschoolers]. Moscow: Pedagogika.

8

Learning and Development of Preschool Children

from the Vygotskian Perspective

Elena Bodrova and Deborah J. Leong

Although Vygotsky’s interest in the issues of learning and development

was not limited to any specific age, it seems that many of his best known

ideas are often discussed in the context of the development of younger chil-

dren. It makes our job as authors who venture to present the Vygotskian

perspective on this subject both easy and challenging. The easy part is to

review these well-known ideas, including the relationship between

teaching/learning and development, the role of make-believe play, and

the evolution of oral speech from public to private. The challenging part

is to look beyond these familiar themes and to present an integral picture

of preschool age from Vygotsky’s perspective and in the broader context

of the cultural–historical perspective. Considering that Vygotsky’s own

writing on this subject is sometimes fragmented and presents more of a

series of brilliant insights than a complete theory, we believe that adding

the work of post-Vygotskians will enrich the readers’ theoretical under-

standing and at the same time provide a necessary connection to possible

practical applications.

definition of preschool age

When describing Vygotsky’s approach to the issues of learning and de-

velopment of preschool children, one should be aware of the meaning

of the term preschool age in Vygotsky’s times. Meaning literally “prior to

entering school,” this term was used to describe a child up to the time

he or she reached the age of 7 or even 8 years. In this sense, the upper

boundaries of the “preschool age” can be roughly equivalent to the end of

“early childhood” – the term used in the Western literature to cover the

entire period from birth to age 8. As for the lower boundaries, in Russia,

children begin to be referred to commonly as “preschoolers” when they

reach the age of 3 years. This “everyday” definition of what preschool means

is consistent with Vygotsky’s own references to the youngest children as

156

Learning and Development of Preschool Children

157


“infants,” to toddlers as “children of early age,” and finally to children who

are yet older as “preschoolers.” Therefore, for the purposes of this chapter

we will primarily focus on how Vygotsky’s theory describes learning and

development for this entire age group. Looking at subsequent elaboration

of Vygotsky’s ideas of early development and learning in the works of his

students and colleagues, we can see that the meaning of the term preschool

had changed. As a result of changes in social practices such as the begin-

ning of formal schooling at an earlier age, the term preschoolers is used by

post-Vygotskians to describe only those children between the ages 3 and 6.

Preschool age for Vygotsky is more than just a chronological concept.

As are other ages (e.g., infancy and early age), it is defined in terms of the

systemic changes that take place in the structure of child’s mental processes

and in terms of its major developmental accomplishments (or “neoforma-

tions” if translated literally) that emerge as a result of a child’s growing

up in a unique “social situation of development” (Vygotsky, 1984). Other

references to preschool age as a distinct period in child development can

be found in Vygotsky’s works on the critical periods in child development

(ibid.). In his theory of critical periods, Vygotsky places preschool between

the crisis of 3 years of age on one end and the crisis of 7 years of age

on the other (see Mahn, this volume, for in-depth description of Vygotsky’s

theory of critical periods).

Describing child development during preschool years, Vygotsky follows

several major themes. The first is the formation of child’s mind as a dynamic

system of mental functions with new higher mental functions emerging

and changing already existing lower mental functions. The preschool age

is the period when this formation goes through its initial stages, when

children’s use of language continues to transform their perception and

begins to transform their attention, memory, imagination, and thinking.

The second theme is the view of child development as the child’s grow-

ing mastery of his or her behavior. In this respect, preschool years cul-

minate in the child’s overcoming the dependence on the environmental

stimuli and becoming capable of intentional behavior through the use of

self-regulatory private speech and participation in make-believe play. The

third theme is the idea that child development is a holistic process with

emotions and cognition acting in unity and affecting each other. This third

theme is not elaborated in Vygotsky’s writing at the same level of detail as

the first two and sometimes makes critics place Vygotsky’s theory in the

category of “cognitive.” However, in describing development of preschool

children, Vygotsky indicated that his views of mental development go

beyond “thought and language” to include such issues as integration of

emotions and cognition at the end of the preschool years and a complex

interplay of emotional and cognitive components in make-believe play.

Finally, the last theme is the theme that is central to Vygotsky’s view on

child development – the idea that the social situation of development is the



158 Elena Bodrova and Deborah J. Leong

“basic source” of development. This idea determines Vygotsky’s approach

to the transition from preschool to school age, including the issue of school

readiness, since the social situation of development

represents the initial moment for all dynamic changes that occur in development

during the given period. It determines wholly and completely the forms and the

path along which the child will acquire ever newer personality characteristics,

drawing them from the social reality as from the basic source of development, the

path along which the social becomes the individual. (Vygotsky, 1998, p. 198)

psychological characteristics of preschool age

Acquisition of Cultural Tools and Emergence of Higher

Mental Functions

During preschool years, important changes take place in the very structure

of mental processes. Whereas most behaviors are still governed by “nat-

ural” or “lower” mental functions, the first signs of future higher mental

functions emerge – first in play and later in other contexts. These first signs

are displayed in behavior that is deliberate and purposeful rather than im-

pulsive, self-regulated rather than reactive, and mediated by language or

other symbolic cultural tools. Of all mental functions, perception becomes

the first to be transformed from a set of diffuse and disorganized sensa-

tions into the system of stable representations with culturally determined

meanings. Other mental functions, such as attention, memory, and imagi-

nation, only start their process of transformation during the preschool age

and acquire their deliberate and mediated forms during primary school

years.


The beginning of preschool age is the time when child’s mental functions

first become organized in a uniquely human and systemic way. Designating

memory as the dominant mental function of preschool age that will be

later replaced by thinking in school-aged children, Vygotsky notes that

for younger children “thinking is remembering,” whereas for the older

ones “remembering is thinking” (Vygotsky, 1998). Before the preschool

years, the child’s cognitive functioning is dominated by perception and

other mental functions, such as memory, attention, and thinking, are not

yet separated from it. In this sense, Vygotsky’s description of cognitive

functioning of toddlers is similar to that of authors (such as Piaget) who

refer to this period as the period of sensori-motor thinking.

The systemic organization of the preschooler’s mind is the outgrowth

of the processes that take place during the previous – early – age and

is primarily associated with children’s mastery of speech. As they use

speech to communicate to others, toddlers form and then refine their first

generalizations – the development that Vygotsky considered critical in



Learning and Development of Preschool Children

159


integrating thought and language. These first generalizations refer pri-

marily to immediately perceived objects and help young children build a

constant picture of the world around them. As children start using words in

addition to manipulating physical objects, their thought becomes liberated

from the limitations of what is immediately perceived, and consequently

perception loses its dominant position in children’s minds. Ability to store

and retrieve the images of the past, now greatly enhanced by children’s

use of language, makes it possible to use past experience in a variety of

situations – from communication to problem solving – thus placing

memory in the center of the cognitive functioning of preschoolers.

The nature of first generalizations reflects general changes in the struc-

ture of the child’s mental functions. In his study of concept development

(Vygotsky, 1987), Vygotsky traces the evolution of the content behind gen-

eralizations used by children of different ages. He describes the very first

generalizations – typically appearing at the end of infancy and beginning of

toddlerhood – as syncrets that are based on the child’s general and undiffer-

entiated emotional perception of an object or an action. As toddlers acquire

larger vocabularies and larger repertoires of practical actions, their gener-

alizations become tied to their perception – the dominant mental function

of the period immediately preceding preschool age. Preschoolers develop

more elaborate generalizations, which transcend the limits of perceived

characteristics of the objects to include characteristics that can be inferred

(such as their function or relation to other objects). These inferences are

often based on children’s past experience, emphasizing the important role

memory plays in the mental functioning of preschoolers. However, even

these, more advanced, generalizations are not yet true concepts: Concept

formation according to Vygotsky requires the child’s ability to use words

or other signs in a specific instrumental function (Vygotsky, 1987).

The ability to use words in their instrumental function develops during

primary school years and can be largely attributed to the specific social

situation of development that children of this age enter – formal school-

ing. Acquisition of specific cultural competencies such as literacy brings

about a major change in children’s use of words and other cultural tools.

However, certain preparatory processes must occur during the preschool

years to allow this major change to take place. One of these processes is

children’s use of words and other signs (such as gestures) in a symbolic

way. Vygotsky notes that younger preschoolers are not yet able to sepa-

rate an object from the word that labels this object. It takes several years

of increasingly complex make-believe play for children to become able to

think of the words (and other symbols) independently of the objects they

denote.

Describing development of speech during preschool years, Vygotsky

focused primarily on children’s use of oral language, while recognizing

children’s drawing as an emergent form of written speech. Preschool age



160 Elena Bodrova and Deborah J. Leong

is the period when children’s use of oral language undergoes the most

dramatic change. According to Vygotsky, it is during preschool years, that

children start using their speech not only for communicating to others but

also for communicating to themselves, and a new form of speech – private

speech


1

– emerges. Unlike Piaget, who associated this phenomenon with

children’s egocentrism and considered it a sign of immature thinking,

Vygotsky viewed private speech as a step on the continuum from pub-

lic (social) speech to inner speech and eventually to verbal thinking

(Vygotsky, 1987). From this perspective, private speech becomes not a sign

of immaturity but instead a sign of progressive development of cognitive

processes.

Vygotsky described two major changes that occur in the use of pri-

vate speech during preschool years. First, the function of private speech

changes. Children start using private speech to accompany their practical

actions. At this point, it is closely intertwined with social speech, which

is directed to other people and which, Vygotsky believes, serves as a pre-

cursor to private speech. Later, private speech becomes exclusively self-

directed and changes its function to organize children’s own behavior. At

the same time, the syntax of private speech changes as well. From com-

plete sentences typical for social speech, a child’s utterances change into

abbreviated phrases and single words unsuited for the purposes of com-

munication to other people but sufficient for communicating to oneself.

Vygotsky uses these two metamorphoses of private speech to illustrate

what he believed to be the universal path of the acquisition of cultural

tools: They are first used externally in interactions with other people and

then internalized and used by an individual to master his or her own men-

tal functions. The onset of private speech marks an important point in the

development of children’s thinking: the beginning of verbal thought. At

the same time it signals an important development in self-regulation: Start-

ing with regulation of their practical actions, children expand their use of

private speech to use it to regulate a variety of their mental processes.

Development of Self-Regulation

The concept of self-regulation plays a prominent role in Vygotsky’s view

of the preschool years, constituting one of the most critical advances in

child development that happens at this time. According to Vygotsky, what

changes in preschool years is the relationship between child’s intentions

and their subsequent implementation in actions. Younger preschoolers act

spontaneously, paying no attention to the possible consequences of their

1

Vygotsky used the term egocentric speech to describe audible self-directed speech; however,

in the Western literature, this phenomenon is commonly referred to as private speech (see,

e.g., Berk & Winsler, 1995).



Learning and Development of Preschool Children

161


actions. By the end of preschool age, children acquire the ability to plan

the actions before executing them. Whether they discuss the play scenario

with their peers, choose paints for their art project, or decide on the final

appearance of their block structure – in all these situations children are

guided by a mental image of the future actions (Vygotsky, 1956). Vygotsky

writes about the development of self-regulation in preschoolers in two

contexts – in relation to the development of private speech and in relation

to the development of make-believe play. Private speech provides children

with the tool: The same words that adults used to use to regulate children’s

behavior can be now used by children themselves for the purposes of self-

regulation. Make-believe play provides a unique context that supports the

use of self-regulation through a system of roles and corresponding rules.

Play also keeps preschoolers willing to forgo their immediate wishes in

favor of following the rules by allowing them to fulfill their greater desires

in a symbolic form.



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


title-author-reading-88.html

title-author-reading-92.html

title-author-reading-97.html

title-belonging---shif-2.html

title-benthic-communities.html