1 ... 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 ... 42

Vygotsky’s Educational Theory in Cultural Context - bet 31

bet31/42
Sana15.06.2018
Hajmi4.21 Mb.

References

Allport, G. (1948). Foreword. In H. W. Werner, Comparative psychology of mental

development (pp. ix–xii). Chicago: Follett.

Apple, M. (1988). Teachers and texts: A political economy of class and gender relations in

education. New York: Routledge.

Bakhtin, M. M. (1981). The dialogic imagination: Four essays by M. M. Bakhtin

(M. Holquist, Ed. and C. Emerson and M. Holquist, Trans.). Austin: University

of Texas Press.



340 Anne DiPardo and Christine Potter

Beer, J., & Beer, J. (1992). Burnout and stress, depression and self-esteem of teachers.

Psychological Reports, 71, 1331–1336.

Boler, M. (1999). Feeling power: Emotions and education. New York: Routledge.

Bradshaw, R. (1991). Stress management for teachers: A practical approach. The Clearing House, 65, 43–47.

Brand, A. (1989). The psychology of writing: The affective experience. Westport, CT:

Greenwood.

Brand, A. (1991). Social cognition, emotions, and the psychology of writing. Journal

of Advanced Composition, 11(2), 395–407.

Bruner, J. (1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University

Press.

Bruner, J. (1987). Prologue to the English edition. In R. Rieber & A. Carton (Eds.),

The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (N. Minick, Trans.) (Vol. 1, pp. 1–16). New York:

Plenum Press.

Calhoun, C. (1984). Cognitive emotions. In Calhoun, C. & Solomon, R. (Eds.), What is an emotion? Classic readings in philosophical psychology (pp. 327–342). New York:

Oxford University Press.

Carter, K. (1993). The place of story in the study of teaching and teacher education. Educational Researcher, 22(1), 5–12.

Cedoline, A. J. (1982). Job burnout in public education: Symptoms, causes, and survival

skills. New York: Teachers College Press.

Clandinin, D. J., & Connelly, F. M. (1995). Teachers’ professional knowledge landscapes.

New York: Teachers College Press.

Clark, C. (1995). Thoughtful teaching. New York: Teachers College Press.

Clift, R., Veal, M., Holland, P., Johnson, M., & McCarthy, J. (1995). Collaborative leadership and shared decision making: Teachers, principals, and university professors.

New York: Teachers College Press.

Cole, M. (1985). The zone of proximal development: Where culture and cognition

create each other. In J. V. Wertsch (Ed.), Culture, communication, and cognition:

Vygotskian perspectives (pp. 146–161). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Connelly, M., & Clandinin, J. (1990). Stories of experience and narrative inquiry.

Educational Researcher, 19(5), 2–14.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1991). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York:

HarperCollins.

Czubaj, C. (1996). Maintaining teacher motivation. Education, 116, 372–378.

Damasio, A. (1994). Descartes’ error: Emotion, reason, and the human brain. New York:

Avon.


Damasio, A. (1999). The feeling of what happens: Body and emotion in the making of consciousness. New York: Harcourt Brace.

Damon, W. (1984). Peer education: The untapped potential. Journal of Applied

Psychology, 5, 331–343.

Darwin, C. (1998). The expression of the emotions in man and animals. Excerpted

In J. Jenkins, K. Oatley, & N. Stein (Eds.), Human emotions: A reader (pp. 288–297).

Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Denzin, N. (1984). On understanding emotion. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Derry, S., & Murphy, D. (1986). Designing systems that train learning ability: From

theory to practice. Review of Educational Research, 56(1), 1–39.

Beyond Cognition

341


Dewey, J. (1933). How we think: A restatement of the relation of reflective thinking to the educative process. New York: D. C. Heath.

Dewey, J. (1966). Democracy and education. New York: Free Press.

Dewey, J. (1984). Affective thought. In J. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works,

(Vol. 2, pp. 104–110). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Dickens, C. (1961). Hard times. New York: New American Library.

DiPardo, A., & Freedman, S. W. (1988). Peer response groups in the writing class-

room: Theoretic foundations and new directions. Review of Educational Research, 58(2), 119–149.

DiPardo, A. (1996). Seeking alternatives: The wisdom of collaborative teaching.

English Educations 28(2), 109–126.

DiPardo, A. (1999). Teaching in common: Challenges to joint work in classrooms and

schools. New York: Teachers College Press.

DiPardo, A. (2000). What a little hate literature will do: “Cultural issues” and the

emotional aspect of school change. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 31(3),

306–332.


Duhnam, J. (1984). Stress in teaching. New York: Nichols.

Eliot, T. S. (1971). Hamlet and his problems. Reprinted in H. Adams (ed.), Critical

theory since Plato (pp. 788–790). New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Evans, R. (1996). The human side of school change: Reform resistance, and the real-life

problems of reform. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Flavell, J. (1966). Heinz Werner on the nature of development. In S. Wapner &

B. Kaplan (Eds.), Heinz Werner, 1890–1964: Papers in memoriam (pp. 17–31).

Worcester, MA: Clark University Press.

Franklin, M. (1997). Constructing a developmental psychology: Heinz Werner’s

vision. Contemporary Psychology, 42(6), 481–485.

Franklin, M. (2000). Considerations for a psychology of experience: Heinz Werner’s

contribution. Journal of Adult Development, 7(1), 31–39.

Fried, R. (1996). The passionate teacher: A practical guide. Boston: Beacon.

Fullan, M. (1991). The new meaning of educational change. New York, Toronto: Teachers

College Press/OISE Press.

Fullan, M. (1993). Change forces: Probing the depths of educational reform. London:

Falmer.

Fullan, M. (1999). Change forces: The sequel. London: Falmer.

Gallimore, R., & Tharp, R. (1990). Teaching mind in society: Teaching, schooling, and

literate discourse. In L. Moll (Ed.), Vygotsky and education: Instructional implica-

tions and applications of sociohistorical psychology. New York: Cambridge University

Press.


Glassman, M. (2001). Dewey and Vygotsky: Society, experience, and inquiry in

educational practice. Educational Researcher, 30(4), 3–14.

Glick, J. (1983). Piaget, Vygotsky and Werner. In S. Wapner & B. Kaplan (Eds.), Towards a holistic developmental psychology (pp. 35–52). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Glick, J. (1992). Werner’s relevance for contemporary developmental psychology.

Developmental Psychology, 28(4), 558–565.

Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New York:

Bantam.

Graves, D. (2001). The energy to teach. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.



342 Anne DiPardo and Christine Potter

Greenberg, S. (1984). Stress and the teaching profession. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Gudmundsdottir, S. (1995). The narrative nature of pedagogical content knowl-

edge. In H. McEwan & K. Egan (Eds.), Narrative in teaching, learning and research

(pp. 24–38). New York: Teachers College Press.

Hargreaves, A. (1997). Introduction. In A. Hargreaves (Ed.), Rethinking educational

change with heart and mind: 1997 ASCD Yearbook (pp. vii–xv). Alexandria, VA:

ASCD.


Hargreaves, A. (1998). The emotional politics of teacher development. Keynote

speech presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual

Meeting, San Diego.

Hargreaves, A. (2000). Emotional geographies of teaching. Paper presented at the

American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans.

Hjort, M., & Laver, S. (Eds.) (1997). Emotion and the Arts. New York: Oxford

University Press.

Hochschild, A. (1983). The managed heart: The commercialization of human feeling.

Berkeley: University of California Press.

Isen, A. M., Daubman, K. A., & Nowicki, G. P. (1998). Positive affect facilitates

creative problem solving. In J. Jenkins, K. Oatley, & N. Stein (Eds.), Human emotions: A reader (pp. 288–297). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

James, W. (1950). The principles of psychology. New York: Dover.

Jersild, A. T. (1955). When teachers face themselves. New York: Teachers College Press.

Kelchtermans, G., & Strittmatter, A. (1999). Beyond individual burnout: A per-

spective for improved schools. In R. Vandenberghe and M. Huberman (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 304–314). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kozulin, A. (1990). Vygotsky’s psychology: A biography of ideas. Cambridge, MA:

Harvard University Press.

Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1983). Metaphors we live by. Chicago: University of

Chicago Press.

Langer, S. K. (1942). Philosophy in a new key: A study in the symbolism of reason, rite,

and art. Cambrige, MA: Harvard University Press.

Leontiev, A. N. (1981). The problem of activity in psychology. In J. V. Wertsch

(Ed.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology (pp. 37–71). Armonk, NY:

Sharpe.


Little, J. W. (1993). Teachers’ professional development in a climate of educational

reform. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 15, 129–151.

Little, J. W. (1996). The emotional contours and career trajectories of (disappointed)

reform enthusiasts. Cambridge Journal of Education, 26(3), 345–359.

Luria, A. R. (1987). Afterword to the Russian edition. In R. Rieber & A. Carton

(Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (N. Minick, Trans.) (Vol. 1, pp. 359–

373). New York: Plenum Press.

McCutcheon, G. (1981). On the interpretation of classroom observation. Educational

Researcher, 10, 5–10.

Maeroff, G. I. (1993). Team building for school change: Equipping teachers for new roles.

New York: Teachers College Press.

Maslach, C., & Leiter, M. (1999). Teacher burnout: A research agenda. In

R. Vandenberghe & M. Huberman (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher

Beyond Cognition

343


burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 295–303).

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Merriam, S. (1997). Qualitative research and case study applications in education. San

Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Miller, S. (1999). Supporting possible worlds: Transforming literature teaching and

learning through conversations in the narrative mode. Research in the Teaching of

English, 34(1), 1064.

Miller, S. (2002). Conversations from the commissions: Reflective teaching in the

panic of high-stakes testing. English Education, 34(2), 164–168.

Minick, N., & Stone, C. A., & Forman, E. A. (1993). Introduction: Integration of

individual, social, and institutional processes in accounts of children’s learning

and development. In E. A. Forman, N. Minick, & C. A. Stone (Eds.), Contexts

for learning: Sociocultural dynamics in children’s development (pp. 3–16). New York:

Oxford University Press.

Nietzsche, F. (1971). The birth of tragedy from the spirit of music. Excerpt reprinted

in H. Adams (Ed.), Critical theory since Plato (pp. 636–641). New York: Harcourt

Brace Jovanovich.

Noddings, N. (1984). Caring: A feminine approach to ethics and moral education.

Berkeley: University of California Press.

Noddings, N. (1992). The challenge to care in schools: An alternative approach to educa-

tion. New York: Teachers College Press.

Noddings, N. (1995). Care and moral education. In W. Kohli (Ed.), Critical conver-

sations in philosophy of education (pp. 137–148). New York: Routledge.

Nussbaum, M. (2001). Upheavals of thought: The intelligence of emotions. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press.

Oatley, K. (1992). Best laid schemes: The psychology of emotions. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press.

Oatley, K. & Jenkins, J. (1998). Understanding emotions. Malden, MA:

Blackwell.

Palincsar, A. S., Brown, A. L., & Campione, J. C. (1993). First-grade dialogues for

knowledge acquisition and use. In E. A. Forman, N. Minick, & C. A. Stone (Eds.), Contexts for learning: Sociocultural dynamics in children’s development (pp. 43–57).

New York: Oxford University Press.

Palmer, P. J. (1998). The courage to teach: Exploring the inner landscape of a teacher’s life.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Piaget, J. (1962). The relation of affectivity to intelligence in the mental development

of the child. Bulletin of Menninger Clinic, 26, 129–137.

Piaget, J. (1970). Piaget’s theory. In P. H. Mussen (Ed.), Carmichael’s manual of child psychology (3rd ed., Vol. 1, pp. 703–732). New York: Wiley.

Polanyi, M. (1958). Personal knowledge: Towards a post-critical philosophy. Chicago:

University of Chicago Press.

Polkinghorne, D. (1988). Narrative knowing and the human sciences. Albany: State

University of New York.

Ross, R., & Altmaier, E. (1994). Intervention in occupational stress: A handbook of coun-

seling for stress at work. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Rudow, B. (1999). Stress and burnout in the teaching profession: European studies,

issues, and research perspectives. In R. Vandenberghe & A. Michael Huberman

344 Anne DiPardo and Christine Potter

(Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international

research and practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Russell, D., Altmaier, E., & Van Velzen, D. (1987). Job-related stress, social sup-

port, and burnout among classroom teachers. Journal of Applied Psychology, 72(2),

269–274.


Salzberger-Wittenbert, I., Henry, G., & Osborne, E. (1983). The emotional experience of learning and teaching. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Sarason, S. B. (1996). Revisiting “The culture of the school and the problem of change.”

New York: Teachers College Press.

Sarbin, T. R. (Ed.) (1986). Narrative psychology: The storied nature of human conduct.

New York: Praeger.

Scheff, T. (1994). Bloody revenge: Emotions, nationalism, and war. Boulder, CO:

Westview.

Scheff, T., & Retzinger, S. (1991). Emotion and violence: Shame and rage in destructive

conflicts. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.

Scheffler, I. (1991). In praise of the cognitive emotions and other essays in the philosophy

of education. New York: Routledge.

Sergiovanni, T. (1994). Building community in schools. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Spark, D. (2000). Handling emotion in fiction writing. Writer’s Chronicle, 33(3), 5–13.

Swick, K., & Hanley, P. (1985). Stress and the classroom teacher. Washington, DC:

National Education Association.

Tappan, M. B. (1998). Sociocultural psychology and caring pedagogy: Exploring

Vygotsky’s “Hidden Curriculum.” Educational Psychologist, 33(1), 23–33.

Tharp, R. (1993). Institutional and social context of educational practice and reform.

In E. Forman, N. Minick, & C. A. Stone (Eds.), Contexts for learning: Sociocultural dynamics in children’s development (pp. 269–282). New York: Oxford University

Press.


Tharp, R., & Gallimore, R. (1988). Rousing minds to life: Teaching, learning, and school- ing in social context. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Tolstoy, L. (1971). What is art? Excerpted in H. Adams (Ed.), Critical theory since

Plato (pp. 708–710). New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

van Manen, M. (1991). The tact of teaching: The meaning of pedagogical thoughtfulness.

Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Vinz, R. (1996). Composing a teaching life. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook-

Heinemann.

Vygotsky, L. (1971). The psychology of art. Boston: MITPress.

Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Vygotsky, L. (1986). Thought and language. Cambridge, MA: MITPress.

Vygotsky, L. (1987). Lecture 4: Emotions and their development in childhood. In

R. Rieber & A. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (N. Minick,

Trans.) (Vol. 1, pp. 325–358). New York: Plenum Press.

Walker, R. (1980). The conduct of educational case studies: Ethics, theory and pro-

cedures. In W. B. Dockerell & D. Hamilton (Eds.), Rethinking educational research

(pp. 30–63). London: Hodder & Stoughton.

Wapner, S. (2000). Person-in-environment transitions: Developmental analysis. Journal of Adult Development, 7(1), 7–22.

Werner, H. (1948). Comparative psychology of mental development. Chicago: Follett.



Beyond Cognition

345


Werner, H., & Kaplan, B. (1963). Symbol formation: An organismic-developmental ap- proach to language and the expression of thought. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Wertsch, J. (1991). Voices of the mind: A sociocultural approach to mediated action.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Wertsch, J. (2000). Vygotsky’s two minds on the nature of meaning. In C. D. Lee &

P. Smagorinsky (Eds.), Vygotskian perspectives on literacy research (pp. 19–30).

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wierzbicka, A. (1999). Emotions across languages and cultures: Diversity and universals.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Woods, P. (1999). Intensification and stress in teaching. In R. Vandenberghe &

M. Huberman (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A source-

book of international research and practice (pp. 115–138). Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press.



part iv

DIVERSE LEARNERS AND CONTEXTS OF

EDUCATION

16

Intrapersonal Communication and Internalization

in the Second Language Classroom

James P. Lantolf

This chapter considers an aspect of sociocultural research that has not

been fully explored with regard to second language learning – the process

through which learners develop the repertoire of symbolic artifacts they

use when engaging in communicative activities (verbal and visual) in the

second language. I will argue that the key to this development resides

in internalization, a process closely affiliated with private speech. Carroll

(2001, pp. 16–17) points out that the process of acquisition is “not directly

observable” and can only be inferred “on the basis of other observable

events such as the utterances that learners produce, the interpretation they

assign to utterances they hear or read, the time it takes to interpret an

utterance, their judgements of the acceptability of utterances, etc.” The

specific goal of this chapter is to argue that it is possible to observe, at least in

part, the process of language learning through analysis of the intrapersonal

communication (private speech) produced by learners in concrete objective

circumstances of the language classroom.

Unlike most theories of language acquisition, in particular that espoused

by Chomsky’s innatist theory, the sociocultural perspective recognizes that

humans are not completely at the mercy of their biology; rather it sees hu-

mans as agents who regulate their brains rather than the other way around.

As Vygotsky put it: “I only want to say

. . . that without man

1

[sic] (

=operator)

as a whole the activity of his apparatus (brain) cannot be explained, that

man controls his brain and not the brain the man (Yaroshevsky, 1989, p. 230).

To be sure, Vygotsky recognized that biology constrains mental processing

in important ways, but from this it does not follow that biology, and only

biology, controls our mental activity. Indeed, as Vygotsky argued (1987),

higher mental functions arise as a consequence of humans’ gaining con-

trol over their biologically endowed brains through culturally specified

1

Alex Kozulin (personal communication, January 2002) points out that the original Russian,

chelovek, should be rendered in English as “human being” and not as “man.”

349


350 James P. Lantolf

medational means. Thus, there is a tension, or as Vygotsky characterized

it, “a drama,” between our natural inheritance and our sociocultural in-

heritance, and it is in this drama that we develop.

intrapersonal communication and private speech

The cornerstone of Vygotsky’s theory is his conception that the human

mind, unlike other minds, is mediated by symbolic artifacts (see especially

chapters 1 and 2 in Vygotsky, 1999), which means that the external world is

never directly apprehended but recast and deferred (Frawley, 1997, p. 96).

The links between us and our world are formed through what Vygotsky, by

analogy with Marx’s thinking about physical tools, called “psychological

tools.” The most important of these psychological tools, or signs, is human

language.

Internalization

Sign-based mediation first is intermental and then becomes intramental as

children learn to regulate the mediational tools of their culture and, with

this, their own social and mental activity. The process of moving from the

inter- to the intramental domain takes place through internalization, or, as

some translate the Russian original, interiorization. According to Kozulin

(1990, p. 116), “the essential element in the formation of higher mental func-

tions is the process of internalization.” Frawley (1997, pp. 94–95) notes that

the original Russian term, vrashchivanie, frequently translated into English

as “interiorization,” means “ingrowing.” In Frawley’s words, “The dy-

namic and developmental character of the notion is lost by the English

nominal translation.” The Russian term, according to Frawley, very much

implies the emergence of “active, nurturing transformation of externals

into personally meaningful experience” (p. 95). As A. R. Luria (1979, p. 45)

writes, “It is through this interiorization of historically determined and cul-

turally organized ways of operating on information that the social nature

of people comes to be their psychological nature as well.”

2

Internalization represents Vygotsky’s attempt to overcome the Cartesian

mind–world dualism. According to Galperin (1967, pp. 28–29), through in-

ternalization what is originally an external and nonmental form of activity

becomes mental; thus, the process “opens up the possibility of bridging this

gap” (between the nonmental and the mental). It is important to emphasize

2

Internalization is a concept that is not without its controversies. Unfortunately, space does

not permit even a brief discussion of the debates that continue around this concept. The

interested reader should consult works such as Newman, Griffen, and Cole (1989); Wertsch

(1998); Arievitch and van der Veer (1995); Arievitch and Stetsenko (2000); and Matusov

(1998).


Intrapersonal Communication

351


that internalization does not mean that something literally is “‘within the

individual’ or ‘in the brain,’” but instead “refers to the subject’s ability

to perform a certain action [concrete or ideal] without the immediately

present problem situation ‘in the mind’” (Stetsenko, 1999, p. 245) and with

an understanding that is derived from, but independent of, “someone else’s

thoughts or understandings” (Ball, 2000, p. 250–251). Thus, on this view,

mental activity is carried out “on the basis of mental representations, that is,

independently of the physical presence of things” (Stetsenko, 1999, p. 245).

With regard to second-language (L2) learning, internalization is the pro-

cess through which learners construct a mental representation of what was

at one point physically present (acoustic or visual) in external form. This

representation, in turn, enables them to free themselves from the sensory

properties of a specific concrete situation. Again, to cite Stetsenko, the for-

mation of intrapersonal processes

is explained as the transition from a material object-dependent activity (such as the

actual counting of physical objects by pointing at them with a finger in the initial

stages of acquiring the counting operation) to a material object-independent activity

(when a child comes to be able to count the objects without necessarily touching

them or even seeing them). (1999, pp. 245–255)



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


title-author-reading-42.html

title-author-reading-47.html

title-author-reading-51.html

title-author-reading-56.html

title-author-reading-60.html