1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 13

bet13/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
Connectedness/Contractibility. If X is a closed k-connected n-manifold,
i.e. π
i
(X) = 0 for i = 1, ..., k, then the complement to a point, X ∖{x
0
}, is (n−k−1)-
contractible, i.e. there is a homotopy f
t
of the identity map X
∖ {x
0
} → X ∖ {x
0
}
with P
= f
1
(X ∖ {x
0
}) being a smooth triangulated subspace P ⊂ X ∖ {x
0
} with
codim
(P ) ≥ k + 1.
For example, if π
i
(X) = 0 for 1 ≤ i ≤ n/2, then X is homotopy equivalent to S
n
.
Smooth triangulations. Recall, that “smoothness” of a triangulated subset
in a smooth n-manifold, say P
∈ X, means that, for every closed i-simplex Δ ⊂ P ,
there exist
● an open subset U ⊂ X which contains Δ,
● an affine triangulation P

of
R
n
, n
= dim(X),
● a diffeomorphism U → U

⊂ R
n
which sends Δ onto an i-simplex Δ

in P

.
Accordingly, one defines the notion of a smooth triangulation T of a smooth man-
ifold X, where one also says that the smooth structure in X is compatible with T .
Every smooth manifold X can be given a smooth triangulation, e.g. as follows.

MANIFOLDS
101
Let S be an affine (i.e. by affine simplices) triangulation of
R
M
which is invari-
ant under the action of a lattice Γ
= Z
M
⊂ R
M
(i.e. S is induced from a triangulation
of the M -torus
R
M
/Γ) and let X ⊂
f
R
M
be a smoothly embedded (or immersed)
closed n-submanifold. Then there (obviously) exist
● an arbitrarily small positive constant δ
0
= δ
0
(S) > 0,
● an arbitrarily large constant λ ≥ λ
0
(X, f, δ
0
) > 0,
● δ-small moves of the vertices of S for δ ≤ δ
0
, where these moves themselves
depend on the embedding f of X into
R
M
and on λ, such that the simplices
of the correspondingly moved triangulation, say S

= S

δ
= S

(X, f) are δ

-
transversal to the λ-scaled X, i.e. to λX
= X ⊂
λf
R
M
.
The δ

-transversality of an affine simplex Δ

⊂ R
M
to λX
⊂ R
M
means that the
affine simplices Δ
′′
obtained from Δ

by arbitrary δ

-moves of the vertices of Δ

for
some δ

= δ

(S, δ) > 0 are transversal to λX. In particular, the intersection “angles”
between λX and the i-simplices, i
= 0, 1, ..., M − 1, in S

are all
≥ δ

.
If λ is sufficiently large (and hence, λX
⊂ R
M
is nearly flat), then the δ

-
transversality (obviously) implies that the intersection of λX with each simplex
and its neighbours in S

in the vicinity of each point x
∈ λX ⊂ R
M
has the same
combinatorial pattern as the intersection of the tangent space T
x
(λX) ⊂ R
M
with
these simplices. Hence, the (cell) partition Π
= Π
f

of λX induced from S

can be
subdivided into a triangulation of X
= λX.
Almost all of what we have presented in this section so far was essentially
understood by Poincar´
e, who switched at some point from geometric cycles to
triangulations, apparently, in order to prove his duality. (See [41] for pursuing
further the first Poincar´
e approach to homology.)
The language of geometic/generic cycles suggested by Poincar´
e is well suited for
observing and proving the multitude of obvious little things one comes across every
moment in topology. (I suspect, geometric, even worse, some algebraic topologists
think of cycles while they draw commutative diagrams. Rephrasing J.B.S. Hal-
dane’s words: “Geometry is like a mistress to a topologist: he cannot live without
her but he’s unwilling to be seen with her in public”.)
But if you are far away from manifolds in the homotopy theory it is easier
to work with cohomology and use the cohomology product rather than intersection
product.
The cohomology product is a bilinear pairing, often denoted H
i
⊗ H
j ⌣
→ H
i
+j
,
which is the Poincar´
e dual of the intersection product H
n
−i
⊗ H
n
−j

→ H
n
−i−j
in
closed oriented n-manifolds X.
The
⌣-product can be defined for all, say triangulated, X as the dual of
the intersection product on the relative homology, H
M
−i
(U; ∞) ⊗ H
M
−j
(U; ∞) →
H
M
−i−j
(U; ∞), for a small regular neighbourhood U ⊃ X of X embedded into some
R
M
. The
⌣ product, so defined, is invariant under continuous maps f ∶ X → Y :
f

(h
1
⌣ h
2
) = f

(h
1
) ⌣ f

(h
2
) for all h
1
, h
2
∈ H

(Y ).
It easy to see that the
⌣-pairing equals the composition of the K´’unneth ho-
momorphism H

(X) ⊗ H

(X) → H

(X × X) with the restriction to the diagonal
H

(X × X) → H

(X
diag
).
You can hardly expect to arrive at anything like Serre’s finiteness theorem
without a linearized (co)homology theory; yet, geometric constructions are of a
great help on the way.

102
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Topological and
Q-manifolds. The combinatorial proof of the Poincar´e du-
ality is the most transparent for open subsets X
⊂ R
n
where the standard decompo-
sition S of
R
n
into cubes is the combinatorial dual of its own translate by a generic
vector.
Poincar´
e duality remains valid for all oriented topological manifolds X and
also for all rational homology or
Q-manifolds, that are compact triangulated n-
spaces where the link L
n
−i−1
⊂ X of every i-simplex Δ
i
in X has the same rational
homology as the sphere S
n
−i−1
, where it follows from the (special case of) Alexander
duality.
The rational homology of the complement to a topologically em-
bedded k-sphere as well as of a rational homology sphere, into S
n
(or into a
Q-manifold with the rational homology of S
n
) equals
that of the
(n − k − 1)-sphere.
(The link L
n
−i−1

i
) is the union of the simplices Δ
n
−i−1
⊂ X which do not intersect
Δ
i
and for which there exists an simplex in X which contains Δ
i
and Δ
n
−i−1
.)
Alternatively, an n-dimensional space X can be embedded into some
R
M
where
the duality for X reduces to that for “suitably regular” neighbourhoods U
⊂ R
M
of
X which admit Thom isomorphisms H
i
(X) ↔ H
i
+M−n
(U

).
If X is a topological manifold, then “locally generic” cycles of complementary
dimension intersect at a discrete set which allows one to define their geometric
intersection index. Also one can define the intersection of several cycles C
j
, j
=
1, ...k, with

j
dim
(C
i
) = dim(X) as the intersection index of ×
j
C
j
⊂ X
k
with
X
diag
⊂ X
k
, but anything more then that can not be done so easily.
Possibly, there is a comprehensive formulation with an obvious invariant proof
of the “functorial Poincar´
e duality” which would make transparent, for example, the
multiplicativity of the signature (see below) and the topological nature of rational
Pontryagin classes (see section 10) and which would apply to “cycles” of dimensions
βN where N
= ∞ and 0 ≤ β ≤ 1 in spaces like these we shall meet in section 11.
Signature. The intersection of (compact) k-cycles in an oriented, possibly
non-compact and/or disconnected, 2k-manifold X defines a bilinear form on the
homology H
k
(X). If k is odd, this form is antisymmetric and if k is even it is
symmetric.
The signature of the latter, i.e. the number of positive minus the number of
negative squares in the diagonalized form, is called sig
(X). This is well defined if
H
k
(X) has finite rank, e.g. if X is compact, possibly with a boundary.
Geometrically, a diagonalization of the intersection form is achieved with a
maximal set of mutually disjoint k-cycles in X where each of them has a non-
zero (positive or negative) self-intersection index. (If the cycles are represented by
smooth closed oriented k-submanifolds, then these indices equal the Euler numbers
of the normal bundles of these submanifolds. In fact, such a maximal system of
submanifolds always exists as it was derived by Thom from the Serre finiteness
theorem.)
Example
(a). S
2k
×S
2k
has zero signature, since the 2k-homology is generated
by the classes of the two coordinate spheres
[s
1
× S
2k
] and [S
2k
× s
2
], which both
have zero self-intersections.

MANIFOLDS
103
Example
(b). The complex projective space
CP
2m
has signature one, since
its middle homology is generated by the class of the complex projective subspace
CP
m
⊂ CP
2m
with the self-intersection
= 1.
Example
(c). The tangent bundle T
(S
2k
) has signature 1, since H
k
(T (S
2k
)) is
generated by
[S
2k
] with the self-intersection equal the Euler characteristic χ(S
2k
) =
2.
It is obvious that sig
(mX) = m ⋅ sig(X), where mX denotes the disjoint union
of m copies of X, and that sig
(−X) = −sig(X), where “−” signifies reversion of
orientation. Furthermore
Theorem
(Rokhlin 1952). The oriented boundary X of every compact oriented
(4k + 1)-manifold Y has zero signature.
(Oriented boundaries of non-orientable manifolds may have non-zero signa-
tures.
For example the double covering ˜
X
→ X with sig( ˜
X
) = 2sig(X) non-
orientably bounds the corresponding 1-ball bundle Y over X.)
Proof.
If k-cycles C
i
, i
= 1, 2, bound relative (k + 1)-cycles D
i
in Y , then the
(zero-dimensional) intersection C
1
with C
2
bounds a relative 1-cycle in Y which
makes the index of the intersection zero. Hence,
the intersection form vanishes on the kernel ker
k
⊂ H
k
(X) of the
inclusion homomorphism H
k
(X) → H
k
(Y ).
On the other hand, the obvious identity
[C ∩ D]
Y
= [C ∩ ∂D]
X
and the Poincar´
e duality in Y show that the orthogonal complement ker

k
⊂ H
k
(X)
with respect to the intersection form in X is contained in ker
k
.
Observe that this argument depends entirely on the Poincar´
e duality and it
equally applies to the topological and
Q-manifolds with boundaries.
Also notice that the K´’unneth formula and the Poincar´
e duality (trivially) imply
the Cartesian multiplicativity of the signature for closed manifolds,
sig
(X
1
× X
2
) = sig(X
1
) ⋅ sig(X
2
).
For example, the products of the complex projective spaces
×
i
CP
2k
i
have signatures
one. (The K´’unneth formula is obvious here with the cell decompositions of
×
i
CP
2k
i
into
×
i
(2k
i
+ 1) cells.)
Amazingly, the multiplicativity of the signature of closed manifolds under cov-
ering maps can not be seen with comparable clarity.
Theorem
(Multiplicativity Formula). If ˜
X
→ X is an l-sheeted covering map,
then
sign
( ˜
X
) = l ⋅ sign(X).
This can be sometimes proved by elementary, means, e.g. if the fundamental
group of X is free. In this case, there obviously exist closed hypersurfaces Y
⊂ X
and ˜
Y
⊂ ˜
X such that ˜
X
∖ ˜
Y is diffeomorphic to the disjoint union of l copies of
X
∖ Y . This implies multiplicativity, since signature is additive:
removing a closed hypersurface from a manifold does not change
the signature.

104
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Therefore,
sig
( ˜
X
) = sig( ˜
X
∖ ˜
Y
) = l ⋅ sig(X ∖ Y ) = l ⋅ sig(X).
(This “additivity of the signature” easily follows from the Poincar´
e duality as ob-
served by S. Novikov.)
In general, given a finite covering ˜
X
→ X, there exists an immersed hypersurface
Y
⊂ X (with possible self-intersections) such that the covering trivializes over X∖Y ;
hence, ˜
X can be assembled from the pieces of X
∖ Y where each piece is taken l
times. One still has an addition formula for some “stratified signature” but it is
rather involved in the general case.
On the other hand, the multiplicativity of the signature can be derived in a
couple of lines from the Serre finiteness theorem (see below).
5. The Signature and Bordisms
Let us prove the multiplicativity of the signature by constructing a compact
oriented manifold Y with a boundary, such that the oriented boundary ∂
(Y ) equals
m ˜
X
− mlX for some integer m ≠ 0.
Embed X into
R
n
+N
, N
>> n = 2k = dim(X) let ˜
X
⊂ R
n
+N
be an embedding
obtained by a small generic perturbation of the covering map ˜
X
→ X ⊂ R
n
+N
and
˜
X

⊂ R
n
+N
be the union of l generically perturbed copies of X.
Let ˜
A

and ˜
A


be the Atiyah-Thom maps from S
n
+N
= R
n
+N

to the Thom
spaces ˜
U

and U


of the normal bundles ˜
U
→ ˜
X and ˜
U

→ ˜
X

.
Let ˜
P
∶ ˜
X
→ X and ˜
P

∶ ˜
X

→ X be the normal projections. These projections,
obviously, induce the normal bundles ˜
U and ˜
U

of ˜
X and ˜
X

from the normal bundle
U

→ X. Let
˜
P

∶ ˜
U

→ U


and ˜
P


∶ ˜
U


→ U


be the corresponding maps between the Thom spaces and let us look at the two
maps f and f

from the sphere S
n
+N
= R
N
+n

to the Thom space U


,
f
= ˜
P

○ ˜
A

∶ S
n
+N
→ U


, and f

= ˜
P


○ ˜
A


∶ S
n
+N
→ U


.
Clearly
[˜●˜●

]
f
−1
(X) = ˜
X and
(f

)
−1
(X) = ˜
X

.
On the other hand, the homology homomorphisms of the maps f and f

are
related to those of ˜
P and ˜
P

via the Thom suspension homomorphism S

∶ H
n
(X) →
H
n
+N
(U


) as follows
f

[S
n
+N
] = S

○ ˜
P

[ ˜
X
] and f


[S
n
+N
] = S

○ ˜
P


[ ˜
X

].
Since deg
( ˜
P
) = deg( ˜
P

) = l,
˜
P

[ ˜
X
] = ˜
P


[ ˜
X

] = l ⋅ [X] and f

[S
n
+N
] = f[S
n
+N
] = l ⋅ S

[X] ∈ H
n
+N
(U


);
hence,
some non-zero m-multiples of the maps f, f

∶ S
n
+N
→ U


can be
joined by a (smooth generic) homotopy F
∶ S
n
+N
× [0, 1] → U



MANIFOLDS
105
by Serre’s theorem, since π
i
(U


) = 0, i = 1, ...N − 1.
Then, because of
[˜●˜●

], the pullback F
−1
(X) ⊂ S
n
+N
× [0, 1] establishes a bor-
dism between m ˜
X
⊂ S
n
+N
× 0 and m ˜
X

= mlX ⊂ S
n
+N
× 1. This implies that
m
⋅ sig( ˜
X
) = ml ⋅ sig(X) and since m ≠ 0 we get sig( ˜
X
) = l ⋅ sig(X). QED.
Bordisms and the Rokhlin-Thom-Hirzebruch Formula. Let us modify
our definition of homology of a manifold X by allowing only non-singular i-cycles
in X, i.e. smooth closed oriented i-submanifolds in X and denote the resulting
Abelian group by
B
o
i
(X).
If 2i
≥ n = dim(X) one has a (minor) problem with taking sums of non-singular
cycles, since generic i-submanifolds may intersect and their union is unavoidably
singular. We assume below that i
< n/2; otherwise, we replace X by X × R
N
for
N
>> n, where, observe, B
o
i
(X × R
N
) does not depend on N for N >> i.
Unlike homology, the bordism groups
B
o
i
(X) may be non-trivial even for a
contractible space X, e.g. for X
= R
n
+N
. (Every cycle in
R
n
equals the boundary
of any cone over it but this does not work with manifolds due to the singularity at
the apex of the cone which is not allowed by the definition of a bordism.) In fact,
we have the following.
Theorem
(Thom, 1954). if N
>> n, then the bordism group B
o
n
= B
o
n
(R
n
+N
)
is canonically isomorphic to the homotopy group π
n
+N
(V

), where V

is the Thom
space of the tautological oriented
R
N
-bundle V over the Grassmann manifold V
=
Gr
or
N
(R
n
+N+1
)
Proof.
Let X
0
= Gr
or
N
(R
n
+N
) be the Grassmann manifold of oriented N-planes
and V
→ X
0
the tautological oriented
R
N
bundle over this X
0
.
(The space Gr
or
N
(R
n
+N
) equals the double cover of the space Gr
N
(R
n
+N
) of non-
oriented N -planes. For example, Gr
or
1
(R
n
+1
) equals the sphere S
n
, while Gr
1
(R
n
+1
)
is the projective space, that is S
n
divided by the
±-involution.)
Let U
→ X be the oriented normal bundle of X with the orientation induced
by those of X and of
R
N
⊃ X and let G ∶ X → X
0
be the oriented Gauss map which
assigns to each x
∈ X the oriented N-plane G(x) ∈ X
0
parallel to the oriented
normal space to X at x.
Since G induces U

from V , it defines the Thom map S
n
+N
= R
n
+N

→ V

and
every bordism Y
⊂ S
n
+N
× [0, 1] delivers a homotopy S
n
+N
× [0, 1] → V

between
the Thom maps at the two ends Y
∩ S
n
+N
× 0 and Y ∩ S
n
+N
× 1.
This define a homomorphism
τ

∶ B
o
n
→ π
n
+N
(V

)
since the additive structure in
B
o
n
(R
i
+N
) agrees with that in π
i
+N
(V
o

). (Instead
of checking this, which is trivial, one may appeal to the general principle: “two
natural Abelian group structures on the same set must coincide.”)
Also note that one needs the extra 1 in
R
n
+N+1
, since bordisms Y between
manifolds in
R
n
+N
lie in
R
n
+N+1
, or, equivalently, in S
n
+N+1
× [0, 1].
On the other hand, the generic pullback construction
f
↦ f
−1
(X
0
) ⊂ R
n
+N
⊃ R
n
+N

= S
n
+N
defines a homomorphism τ
πb
∶ [f] → [f
−1
(X
0
)] from π
n
+N
(V

) to B
o
n
, where, clearly
τ
πb
○ τ

and τ

○ τ
πb
are the identity homomorphisms.
Now Serre’s
Q-sphericity theorem implies the following.

106
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Theorem
(Thom Theorem). The (Abelian) group
B
o
i
is finitely generated;
B
o
n

Q is isomorphic to the rational homology group H
i
(X
0
;
Q) = H
i
(X
0
) ⊗ Q for X
0
=
Gr
or
N
(R
i
+N+1
).
Indeed, π
i
(V

) = 0 for N >> n, hence, by Serre,
π
n
+N
(V

) ⊗ Q = H
n
+N
(V

;
Q),
while
H
n
+N
(V

;
Q) = H
n
(X
0
;
Q)
by the Thom isomorphism.
In order to apply this, one has to compute the homology H
n
(Gr
or
N
(R
N
+n+j
)); Q),
which, as it is clear from the above, is independent of N
≥ 2n + 2 and of j > 1; thus,
we pass to
Gr
or
=
def

j,N
→∞
Gr
or
N
(R
N
+j
).
Let us state the answer in the language of cohomology, with the advantage of
the multiplicative structure (see section 4) where, recall, the cohomology product
H
i
(X) ⊗ H
j
(X)

→ H
i
+j
(X) for closed oriented n-manifold can be defined via
the Poincar´
e duality H

(X) ↔ H
n
−∗
(X) by the intersection product H
n
−i
(X) ⊗
H
n
−j
(X)

→ H
n
−(i+j)
(X).


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-20.html

the-series-of-the-25.html

the-series-of-the-3.html

the-series-of-the-34.html

the-series-of-the-39.html