1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 3

bet3/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
to, but different from, the way Donaldson’s theory is currently related to physical
theory.
Speculation is risky but essential for progress.
But ideas evolve, in a

6
MICHAEL ATIYAH
Darwinian process, with successful ones taking off and unsuccessful ones quietly
withering. My speculation may or may not survive the competition. The future
will tell.
Trinity College, Cambridge and Edinburgh University

Clay Mathematics Proceedings
Volume 19, 2014
100 Years of Topology: Work Stimulated
by Poincar´
e’s Approach to Classifying Manifolds
John W. Morgan
1. Introduction
Since its formulation in 1904, the Poincar´
e Conjecture has stood as a signal
problem in topology. As such, it has attracted the attention of the leading topolo-
gists of each generation. As I will explain in this lecture, while the purely topological
methods used to attack this question did not succeed, they have proved extremely
fruitful in resolving closely related questions about manifolds. The Poincar´
e Con-
jecture continued to stand unresolved but the progress it generated made topology
one of the most exciting and vibrant subjects during the twentieth century. The
final irony of this story is that the method of solution comes not from the purely
topological approach that Poincar´
e originally suggested but rather from more geo-
metric and analytic approaches that have their foundations in other aspects of
Poincar´
e’s work. While it is impossible to know for sure what Poincar´
e would have
thought of the history of his conjecture and the nature of the solution, it is natural
and pleasing to speculate that he would have completely approved of the method.
This presentation is different from the others in this conference, which will
be concerned either with details of the proof of the Poincar´
e Conjecture or the
closely related Geometrization Conjecture or an exposition of related subjects. By
and large those presentations will cover more geometric and analytic topics. My
presentation mostly covers purely topological material. My aim is to show the
background of Poincar´
e’s work leading up to his conjecture as he grappled with how
to understand the topology of manifolds. Then I will explain his direct approach
to his conjecture about the 3-sphere and why the direct approach has been so
tantalizing to generation after generation of topologists. I will then discuss how the
study on manifolds evolved since Poincar´
e’s time, and what successes successive
generations of topologists did have with techniques that can be traced back to
Poincar´
e. Lastly, I will sketch the modern developments where ideas from physics,
geometry, and analysis have been brought to bear on the difficult questions about
3- and 4-dimensional manifolds.
It is clear from reading l’Analysis Situs and its complements that Poincar´
e’s goal
was to understand higher dimensional manifolds (higher in the sense of greater than
2, surfaces being much studied and well understood by then). He introduces various
ways to present, or define, these spaces; he is concerned with explicit examples
and with contexts in which the techniques of l’Analysis Situs can shed light on
c 2014 John W. Morgan
7

8
JOHN W. MORGAN
more geometric and dynamic questions, for example the study of algebraic surfaces.
A recurring theme is the role of the Betti numbers and their generalization to
include what Poincar´
e calls torsion coefficients and the fundamental group, which
are closely related algebraic invariants. Throughout this series of papers, Poincar´
e
is wondering and conjecturing, often incorrectly, whether these algebraic invariants
are enough to determine the manifold up to isomorphism. He begins to understand
the depth and difficulty of this question as he focuses in on 3-manifolds in the fifth
and last complement to l’Analysis Situs. It is then that he formulates his famous
conjecture: This conjecture concerns the lowest mysterious dimension, 3, and the
simplest manifold in that dimension, S
3
, and proposes a characterization of that
manifold in terms of these algebraic invariants, namely a characterization in terms
of the fundamental group.
Let me present a brief survey of what was to follow. The theory of characteristic
classes flowing from the work of Chern, Weil, and Whitney, cobordism theory as in-
troduced by Thom, Smale’s proof of the h-cobordism theorem and the resolution of
the high dimensional Poincar´
e Conjecture, exotic smooth structures on the spheres
introduced by Milnor in 1956 and studied by Kervaire-Milnor in the early 1960s,
leading to Browder-Novikov surgery theory in the late 1960s and Kirby-Siebenmann
triangulation theory around 1970 gave answers for dimensions
≥ 5 to Poincar´e’s
general search for a set of algebraic invariants to classify manifolds and what prop-
erties their algebraic invariants must have. This was the easy part and followed, in
spirit at least, the path that Poincar´
e indicated. It was a purely topological discus-
sion using differentiable techniques, combinatorial techniques (triangulations) and
robust algebraic topology to arrive at the answers. The outcome is as good a classi-
fication scheme as possible—we cannot answer all the questions that Poincar´
e would
have hoped for, but we know exactly what we can know. One thing that came out
of this analysis that was completely unsuspected by Poincar´
e is that differentiable
classification on the one hand and topological or combinatorial classification on the
other hand are different. Thus, any smooth manifold of dimension at least 5 with
trivial fundamental group and the homology of a sphere is homeomorphic to the
sphere (this is Smale’s theorem), but Milnor produced smooth manifolds with these
properties starting in dimension 7 that are not diffeomorphic to the sphere. This
divergence of smooth and topological manifolds is a high dimensional phenomenon;
in dimension 3 the classifications agree.
The remaining dimensions, 3 and 4, have proven more difficult and have not
been susceptible (to date) to purely topological reasoning. Geometry, analysis, and
physics have played a large role in unravelling the mysteries of these dimensions.
But before we get to that there is one part of the story in these exceptional dimen-
sions where purely topological techniques have been shown to be powerful enough.
This is when the 3-manifold has boundary of genus
≥ 1 or when the 3-manifold
admits an embedded surface of genus
≥ 1 whose fundamental group injects into the
fundamental group of the manifold. In these cases the work of Papakyriakopoulos
in the 1950s on Dehn’s lemma and the loop theorem led to work of Haken and Wald-
hausen in the 1960s to completely resolve the analogue of the Poincar´
e Conjecture
for these manifolds.
This completes a review of the purely topological advances. Let us turn now to
the more geometric and analytic work. The complete understanding of 3-manifolds
requires the analytic method of Ricci flow introduced by Hamilton in the 1980s,

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
9
developed by Hamilton thorugh the 1980s and 1990s, and extended masterfully by
Perelman in 2002–2003. These developments will be explained in detail by others.
Manifolds of dimension 4 are even more of a mystery. In 1980 Freedman man-
aged to push down the high dimensional techniques to prove the 4-dimensional
analogue of the Poincar´
e Conjecture for topological 4-manifolds. At about the
same time, Donaldson using the Anti-Self-Dual equations from physics introduced
non-classical (i.e., not homotopy-theoretic) invariants for 4-manifolds. These have
been used to show that differentiable 4-manifolds up to diffeomorphism are very
complicated and their classification is unlike the topological classification and is also
very different from the classifications one finds in other dimensions. This part of the
story is still a mystery: we know that it is far more complicated than we currently
understand but we have no idea how to understand completely these manifolds.
I hope this brief survey makes clear that, overall, Poincar´
e was prescient. The
general approach he took, the types of questions he was asking, and the methods
he was using form the basis of all of the developments of topology of manifolds
and the applications of this field to geometric problems that followed. But history
has shown that in focusing as he did on S
3
, Poincar´
e was misguided on two fronts.
First, even though 3 is the lowest mysterious dimension, it and 4 turn out to be the
two hardest dimensions to deal with. Second, even though S
3
is in some sense the
simplest 3-manifold it is the most difficult to deal with—‘larger’ 3-manifolds are
easier to understand. In the end he formulated one of the most difficult questions as
the next one to study. This was fortunate. It meant that no matter what startling
progress was made, it was clear to all workers that that progress was not enough,
Poincar´
e’s original question remained there unanswered as a beacon to spur further
work and as a test of new ideas in the study of the topology of manifolds.
I wish to thank Peter Shalen and Cameron Gordon for their help in prepar-
ing this account. Also, I recommend to the interested reader Cameron’s excellent
history [14] of 3-manifold topology up to 1960 which I drew on in preparing this
account.
2. l’Analysis Situs, and its five complements
In 1892 Poincar´
e [33] published a short note entitled Sur l‘Analysis Situs. This
was followed in 1895 by the much longer l’Analysis Situs [34] and its complements,
one through five, [35, 36, 37, 38, 39], published in 1899, 1900, 1902, 1902, and
1905. In 1901, he wrote an analysis of his scientific works (published in 1921) where
he said “ A method which lets us understand the qualitative relations in spaces of
dimensions more than 3 could, to a certain extent, render service analogous to that
rendered by figures ... In spite of everything, until now this branch of science has
not been developed much....As far as I am concerned, every one of the diverse paths
that I have followed, one after the other, have led me to analysis situs.”
I think it is fair to say that this series of articles represents the founding of
Topology, which is the modern name of what Poincar´
e called Analysis Situs, as
an independent branch of mathematics. Many, if not most, of the themes that
dominated the development of topology from 1900 until at least the 1960s are
either explicitly introduced or at least foreshadowed in this series of articles. I will
briefly describe the high points of these seven articles.
2.1. Sur l’Analysis Situs (1892) [33]. The paper is a short one. In it
Poincar´
e gives an example of two manifolds with the same Betti numbers but with

10
JOHN W. MORGAN
different fundamental group, thus answering a question in the negative that he had
pondered: namely whether two closed manifolds with the same Betti numbers were
topologically equivalent. Poincar´
e presents the examples as quotients of the unit
cube
{(x, y, z) 0 ≤ x, y, z ≤ 1}
by identifications of opposite faces: The pair of faces
{x = 0} and {x = 1} are
identified by the map x
→ x + 1; similarly the faces {y = 0} and {y = 1} are
identified by y
→ y + 1. These identifications produce a 3-manifold with boundary
which is the product of a two-torus with the unit interval. The torus boundary
components are then identified by
(x, y, z)
→ (αx + βy, γx + δy, z + 1),
where
A =
α
β
γ
δ
is an element of SL(2,
Z). This last identification produces a torus bundle over the
circle with gluing (i.e., monodromy) A. Poincar´
e observes that two such manifolds
constructed with monodromies A and A have the same fundamental group if and
only A and A are conjugate in SL(2,
Z), and on the other hand the first (and hence
second) Betti number for a general element of SL(2,
Z) is one.
2.2. l’Analysis Situs (1895) [34]. This is a long (121 pages), foundational
paper. Poincar´
e begins by defending the study he is about to undertake by saying
“Geometry in n-dimensions has a real goal; no one doubts this today. Objects in
hyperspace are susceptible to precise definition like those in ordinary space, and
even if we can’t represent them to ourselves we can conceive of them and study
them.” There then follows a discursive introduction to the study of the topology
of manifolds. Many of the approaches and techniques that came to dominate 20
th
century topology are introduced in this paper. It truly is the beginning of Topology
as an independent branch of mathematics. To give you a sense of the scope of this
paper, I will briefly review its highlights.
Poincar´
e begins by defining a manifold (of dimension n
− p) as a subspace of
n-dimensional space given by p equalities:
F
1
(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) = 0, ..., F
p
(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) = 0
and some inequalities:
ϕ
1
(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) > 0, . . . , ϕ
q
(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) > 0,
subject to the condition that the F
j
and ϕ
k
are C
1
and the rank of the Jacobian
differential of the system of F
1
, . . . , F
p
is p at every solution. He also considers
manifolds defined by locally closed, one-one immersions from open subsets of Eu-
clidean n
− p-space. He goes on to consider manifolds covered by overlapping
subsets of either type (though he is considering the real analytic situation where
the extensions are given by analytic continuation). Having defined manifolds, he
considers orientability, orientations, and homology. For him cycles are embedded
closed submanifolds and the relation of homology is given by embedded compact
submanifolds with boundaries. He defines the Betti numbers as the number of
linearly independent cycles of each dimension
1
.
1
Actually, Poincar´
e’s definition is one more than the number of linearly independent cycles.

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
11
Poincar´
e then turns to integration of what today are called differential forms
over compact submanifolds. Namely, he writes down the condition that a form be
closed and then he states (in modern language) that any closed form integrated
over a cycle that is homologous to zero gives the result of zero. What Poincar´
e
formulates is a special case of a general theorem, which goes under the name of (the
higher dimensional) Stokes’ Theorem. The first results along these lines date to the
early 19
th
-century and are due to Cauchy, Green, Stokes and Gauss for ordinary
curves and surfaces in 3-space. The modern formulation required (one could argue
forced) the notion of differential forms and exterior differentiation, both of which
were slowly emerging at Poincar´
e’s time and which were first written down in more
or less modern form by Cartan, [5]. For a history of Stokes’ Theorem see [19].
Next, Poincar´
e takes up the intersection number of closed, oriented manifolds
of complementary dimension and shows that if one of the manifolds is homologous
to zero then the intersection number is zero. He examines in more detail the case
when one of the manifolds is of dimension 1 and the other is of codimension 1. He
shows that if the manifold of codimension 1 is not homologous to zero then there
is a closed 1-manifold (i.e., a circle) that has a non-trivial intersection number
with it. Indeed, by separation arguments he finds a circle that has intersection
number 1 with the given codimension-1 submanifold. He then generalizes this idea
to higher dimensions arriving at a form of Poincar´
e duality for closed, orientable
manifolds and concludes for example that the middle Betti number of a closed,
oriented manifold of dimension 4k + 2 is always even.
Next, Poincar´
e passes to a form of combinatorial topology, giving another way
to construct manifolds. He considers spaces made by identifying the codimension-1
faces in pairs of one or more polyhedra. He shows that in dimension 3 in order
to get a manifold it is necessary and sufficient that the link of each vertex in the
resulting space have Euler characteristic 2. A related construction of manifolds is
to take a free, properly discontinuous group action on, say, Euclidean space. The
relation with the previous example comes from taking a fundamental domain for
the action and using the group to subdivide the boundary into faces which are then
identified in pairs.
Poincar´
e then introduces the fundamental group. He does so by considering
multi-valued functions and the action of the group of homotopy classes of based
loops on these functions (hence, giving an explicit representation of the fundamen-
tal group). He describes a presentation of the fundamental group of a manifold
obtained by gluing together in pairs the codimension-1 faces of a polyhedron: a
generator for each pair of codimension-1 faces, a relation around each codimension-
2 face. He also describes how to compute the first Betti number of such a manifold:
namely, abelianize the relations associated with each codimension-2 face. Using this
analysis Poincar´
e gives the examples from Sur l’analysis situs of 2-torus bundles
over the circle with the same Betti numbers but with different fundamental groups,
showing that the Betti numbers are not enough to determine the manifold up to
homeomorphism. He then asks three questions:
(1) Given a presentation of a group is there a manifold with this as its fun-
damental group?
(2) How does one construct this manifold?
(3) If two manifolds have the same dimensions and the same fundamental
group, are they homeomorphic?

12
JOHN W. MORGAN
Poincar´
e then turns to other ways to construct new manifolds from old. He
considers (free) group actions on a manifold and constructs the quotient. His first
example is the projective plane as a quotient of the usual sphere in 3-space by the
antipodal action of
Z/2Z. He also considers products of spheres S
n
× S
n
with the
Z/2Z-action that interchanges the factors and makes the wrong claim that for all
n > 1 the quotient of this action is a closed manifold. (What he actually establishes
is that for n > 1 the quotient has no codimension-1 singularities.)
Lastly, Poincar´
e introduces the Euler number for a manifold that is presented
as divided into pieces (cells), the interior of each being diffeomorphic to a ball of
some dimension, e.g., a triangulation. He introduces the idea of subdivision for
these presentations and, by taking a common subdivision, shows that the Euler
number is independent of subdivision. He then computes the Euler number of a
closed manifold and shows that it is zero if the dimension is odd and that it depends
on the Betti numbers when the dimension is even.
So in this foundational paper we have the definition of manifolds and various
ways of producing them: as solutions to equations and inequalities, as covered
by images of open subsets of ordinary space, as quotients of polyhedra by gluing
together faces, as quotients of free, properly discontinuous group actions. On these
manifolds we have differential forms with exterior differentiation and integration.
We have Betti numbers, Poincar´
e duality relating complementary dimensional Betti
numbers, and we have the Euler characteristic. This is an excellent start for the new
subject of Topology, but Poincar´
e was not finished with this subject. He went on to
write 5 complements to this article where he develops these themes and considers
applications of Topology to Algebraic Geometry.
2.3. The first complement (1899) [35]. This complement is concerned with
the Poincar´
e duality result given in l’Analysis Situs. Poincar´
e states that Heegaard
objected to his result that the Betti numbers in complementary degrees are equal
and gave as an example of a 3-manifold with first Betti number 1 and second
Betti number 0. (Here, the Betti number is taken to be the minimal number of
cycles needed to generate the homology.) Poincar´
e points out that the discrepancy
between Heegaard’s definition and his own is that Heegaard is working over the
integers and Poincar´
e is working over the rational numbers.
Thus, in modern
language Heegaard’s example has torsion first homology and no second homology.
Poincar´
e goes on to say that Heegaard’s objection is well-founded in one way;
namely, Poincar´
e’s proof of duality works in both cases, and therefore must not be
correct. Poincar´
e’s purpose in this complement is to rectify the proof of duality.
This time he approaches the proof from the combinatorial point of view. He
revisits the notion from l’Analysis Situs of a polyhedral decomposition of a manifold
into cells, each cell being a closed submanifold whose boundary is a union of cells
of one lower dimension. Furthermore, the relative interiors of the cells are disjoint.
Unless otherwise specified, Poincar´
e (and we also) restrict to decompositions where
the interior of each cell is differeomorphic to an open ball of some dimension. He
introduces the simplicial homology associated with such a decomposition: This is
defined starting with a chain complex with free abelian chain groups, one
Z in the
k
th
chain group for each k-dimensional cell in the decomposition. A generator of
this free abelian factor is given by chosing an orientation for the cell in question; the
opposite orientation is the opposite generator. The boundary map ∂ of the chain
complex comes from the decomposition of the boundary of a cell as a union of cells

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
13
of one lower dimension. Poincar´
e shows that ∂
◦ ∂ = 0. By definition the homology
of this chain complex is the homology associated with the given decomposition.
Next Poincar´
e introduces the notion of a polyhedral subdivision, where each
of the cells is divided into smaller cells (again keeping the condition that the inte-


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-105.html

the-series-of-the-11.html

the-series-of-the-114.html

the-series-of-the-119.html

the-series-of-the-16.html