1 ... 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 15

bet15/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
x
∈X
0
and let
L{[S]

} ⊂ Q
{[S
4k
−1
]

}
be
the linear span of q
(X) for all such X.
The above shows that the vectors q
(X) of “q-numbers” satisfy, besides 2k + 1
Euler-Poincar´
e and Dehn-Somerville equations, about
exp


2k
/3)
4k

3
linear “Pontrya-
gin relations”.
Observe that the Euler-Poincar´
e and Dehn-Somerville equations do not de-
pend on the
±-orientations of the links but the “Pontryagin relations” are anti-
symmetric since Q
[−S
4k
−1
]

= −Q[S
4k
−1
]

. Both kind of relations are valid for all
Q-manifolds.
What are the codimensions codim
(L{[S
4k
−1
]

} ⊂ Q
{[S
4k
−1
]

}
, i.e. the num-
bers of independent relations between the “q-numbers”, for “specific” collections
{[S
4k
−1
]

}?
It is pointed out in [23] that
● The spaces Q
S
i
±
of antisymmetric
Q-linear combinations of all combina-
torial spheres make a chain complex for the differential q
i
±
∶ Q
S
i
±
→ Q
S
i
−1
±
defined by the linear extension of the operation of taking the oriented
links of all vertices on the triangulated i-spheres S
i

∈ S
i
.
● The operation q
i
±
with values in
Q
S
i
−1
±
, which is obviously defined on all
closed oriented combinatorial i-manifolds X as well as on combinatorial
i-spheres, satisfies
q
i
−1
±
(q
i
±
(X)) = 0 ,
i.e. i-manifolds represent i-cycles in this complex.
Furthermore, it is shown in [23] (as was pointed out to me by Jeff Cheeger) that
all such anti-symmetric relations are generated/exhausted by the relations issuing
from q
n
−1
±
○ q
n
±
= 0, where this identity can be regarded as an “oriented (Pontryagin
in place of Euler-Poincar´
e) counterpart” to the Dehn-Somerville equations.
The exhaustiveness of q
n
−1
±
○q
n
±
= 0 and its (easy, [25]) Dehn-Somerville counter-
part, probably, imply that in most (all?) cases the Euler-Poincar´
e, Dehn-Somerville,
Pontryagin and q
n
−1
±
○ q
n
±
= 0 make the full set of affine (i.e. homogeneous and
non-homogeneous linear) relations between the vectors q
(X), but it seems hard
to effectively (even approximately) evaluate the number of independent relations
issuing from for q
n
−1
±
○ q
n
±
= 0 for particular collections {[S
n
−1
]

} of allowable links
of X
n
.
Examples. Let D
0
= D
0
(Γ) be a Dirichlet-Voronoi (fundamental polyhedral)
domain of a generic lattice Γ
⊂ R
M
and let
{[S
n
−1
]

} consist of the (isomorphism
classes of naturally triangulated) boundaries of the intersections of D
0
with generic
affine n-planes in
R
M
.

MANIFOLDS
113
What is codim
(L{[S
n
−1
]

} ⊂ Q{[S
n
−1
]

}) in this case?
What are the (affine) relations between the “geometric q-numbers” i.e. the
numbers of combinatorial types of intersections σ of λ-scaled submanifolds X

f
R
M
, λ
→ ∞, (as in the triangulation construction in the previous section) with the
Γ-translates of D
0
?
Notice, that some of these σ are not convex-like, but these are negligible for
λ
→ ∞. On the other hand, if λ is sufficiently large all σ can be made convex-like
by a small perturbation f

of f by an argument which is similar to but slightly
more technical than the one used for the triangulation of manifolds in the previous
section.
Is there anything special about the “geometric q-numbers” for “distinguished”
X, e.g. for round n-spheres in
R
N
?
Observe that the ratios of the “geometric q-numbers” are asymptotically defined
for many non-compact complete submanifolds X
⊂ R
M
.
For example, if X is an affine subspace A
= A
n
⊂ R
M
, these ratios are (obvi-
ously) expressible in terms of the volumes of the connected regions Ω in D
⊂ R
M
obtained by cutting D along hypersurfaces made of the affine n-subspaces A

⊂ R
M
which are parallel to A and which meet the
(M − n − 1)-skeleton of D.
What is the number of our kind of relations between these volumes?
There are similar relations/questions for intersection patterns of particular X
with other fundamental domains of lattices Γ in Euclidean and some non-Euclidean
spaces (where the finer asymptotic distributions of these patterns have a slight
arithmetic flavour).
If f
∶ X
n
→ R
M
is a generic map with singularities (which may happen if
M
≤ 2n) and D ⊂ R
M
is a small convex polyhedron in
R
M
with its faces being
δ-transversal to f (e.g. D
= λ
−1
D
0
, λ
→ ∞ as in the triangulations of the previous
section), then the pullback f
−1
(D) ⊂ X is not necessarily a topological cell. How-
ever, some local/additive formulae for certain characteristic numbers may still be
available in the corresponding “non-cell decompositions” of X.
For instance, one (obviously) has such a formula for the Euler characteristic for
all kind of decompositions of X. Also, one has such a “local formula” for sig
(X)
and f
∶ X → R (i.e for M = 1) by Novikov’s signature additivity property mentioned
at the end of the previous section.
It seems not hard to show that all Pontryagin numbers can be thus locally/
additively expressed for M
≥ n, but it is unclear what are precisely the Q-numbers
which are combinatorially/locally/additively expressible for given n
= 4k and M <
n.
(For example, if M
= 1, then the Euler characteristic and the signature are,
probably, the only “locally/additively expressible” invariants of X.)
Bordisms of Immersions. If the allowed singularities of oriented n-cycles
in
R
n
+k
are those of collections of n-planes in general position, then the result-
ing homologies are the bordism groups of oriented immersed manifolds X
n
⊂ R
n
+k
(R.Wells, 1966).
For example if k
= 1, this group is isomorphic to the stable
homotopy group π
st
n
= π
n
+N
(S
N
), N > n + 1, by the Pontryagin pullback construc-
tion, since a small generic perturbation of an oriented X
n
in
R
n
+N
⊃ R
n
+1
⊃ X
n
is embedded into
R
n
+N
with a trivial normal bundle, and where every embedding

114
MIKHAIL GROMOV
X
n
→ R
n
+N
with the trivial normal bundle can be isotoped to such a perturba-
tion of an immersion X
n
→ R
n
+1
⊂ R
n
+N
by the Smale-Hirsch immersion theorem.
(This is obvious for n
= 0 and n = 1).
Since immersed oriented X
n
⊂ R
n
+1
have trivial stable normal bundles, they
have, for n
= 4k, zero signatures by the Serre finiteness theorem. Conversely, the
finiteness of the stable groups π
st
n
= π
n
+N
(S
N
) can be (essentially) reduced by a
(framed) surgery of X
n
(see section 9) to the vanishing of these signatures.
The complexity of π
n
+N
(S
N
) shifts in this picture one dimension down to
bordism invariants of the “decorated self-intersections” of immersed X
n
⊂ R
n
+1
,
which are partially reflected in the structure of the l-sheeted coverings of the loci
of l-multiple points of X
n
.
The Galois group of such a covering may be equal the full permutation group
Π
(l) and the “decorated invariants” live in certain “decorated” bordism groups of
the classifying spaces of Π
(l), where the “dimension shift” suggests an inductive
computation of these groups that would imply, in particular, Serre’s finiteness the-
orem of the stable homotopy groups of spheres. In fact, this can be implemented in
terms of configuration spaces associated to the iterated loop spaces as was pointed
out to me by Andras Sz`
ucs, also see [1], [74].
The simplest bordism invariant of codimension one immersions is the parity
of the number of
(n + 1)-multiple points of generically immersed X
n
⊂ R
n
+1
. For
example, the figure
∞ ⊂ R
2
with a single double point represents a non-zero element
in π
st
n
=1
= π
1
+N
(S
N
). The number of (n+1)-multiple points also can be odd for n = 3
(and, trivially, for n
= 0) but it is always even for codimension one immersions of
orientable n-manifolds with n
≠ 0, 1, 3, while the non-orientable case is more involved
[16], [17].
One knows, (see next section) that every element of the stable homotopy group
π
st
n
= π
n
+N
(S
N
), N >> n, can be represented for n ≠ 2, 6, 14, 30, 62, 126 by an
immersion X
n
→ R
n
+1
, where X
n
is a homotopy sphere; if n
= 2, 6, 14, 30, 62, 126,
one can make this with an X
n
where rank
(H

(X
n
)) = 4.
What is the smallest possible size of the topology, e.g. homology, of the image
f
(X
n
) ⊂ R
n
+1
and/or of the homologies of the (natural coverings of the) subsets of
the l-multiple points of f
(X
n
)?
Geometric Questions about Bordisms. Let X be a closed oriented Rie-
mannian n-manifold with locally bounded geometry, which means that every R-ball
in X admits a λ-bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism onto the Euclidean R-ball.
Suppose X is bordant to zero and consider all compact Riemannian
(n + 1)-
manifolds Y extending X
= ∂(Y ) with its Riemannian tensor and such that the
local geometries of Y are bounded by some constants R

<< R and l

>> λ with the
obvious precaution near the boundary.
One can show that the infimum of the volumes of these Y is bounded by
inf
Y
Vol
(Y ) ≤ F (Vol(X)),
with the power exponent bound on the function F
= F (V ). (F also depends on
R, λ, R

, λ

, but this seems non-essential for R

<< R, λ

>> λ.)
What is the true asymptotic behaviour of F
(V ) for V → ∞?
It may be linear for all we know and the above “dimension shift” picture and/or
the construction from [23] may be useful here.

MANIFOLDS
115
Is there a better setting of this question with some curvature integrals and/or
spectral invariants rather than volumes?
The real cohomology of the Grassmann manifolds can be analytically repre-
sented by invariant differential forms. Is there a compatible analytic/geometric
representation of
B
o
n
⊗ R? (One may think of a class of measurable n-foliations, see
section 10, or, maybe, something more sophisticated than that.)
6. Exotic Spheres
In 1956, to everybody’s amazement, Milnor found smooth manifolds Σ
7
which
were not diffeomorphic to S
N
; yet, each of them was decomposable into the union of
two 7-balls B
7
1
, B
7
2
⊂ Σ
7
intersecting over their boundaries ∂
(B
7
1
) = ∂(B
7
2
) = S
6
⊂ Σ
7
like in the ordinary sphere S
7
.
In fact, this decomposition does imply that Σ
7
is “ordinary” in the topological
category: such a Σ
7
is (obviously) homeomorphic to S
7
.
The subtlety resides in the “equality” ∂
(B
7
1
) = ∂(B
7
2
); this identification of the
boundaries is far from being the identity map from the point of view of either of
the two balls—it does not come from any diffeomorphisms B
7
1
↔ B
7
2
.
The equality ∂
(B
7
1
) = ∂(B
7
2
) can be regarded as a self-diffeomorphism f of the
round sphere S
6
– the boundary of standard ball B
7
, but this f does not extend to
a diffeomorphism of B
7
in Milnor’s example; otherwise, Σ
7
would be diffeomorphic
to S
7
. (Yet, f radially extends to a piecewise smooth homeomorphism of B
7
which
yields a piecewise smooth homeomorphism between Σ
7
and S
7
.)
It follows, that such an f can not be included into a family of diffeomorphisms
bringing it to an isometric transformations of S
6
. Thus, any geometric “energy
minimizing” flow on the diffeomorphism group diff
(S
6
) either gets stuck or develops
singularities. (It seems little, if anything at all, is known about such flows and their
singularities.)
Milnor’s spheres Σ
7
are rather innocuous spaces – the boundaries of (the total
spaces of) 4-ball bundles Θ
8
→ S
4
in some in some
R
4
-bundles V
→ S
4
, i.e. Θ
8
⊂ V
and, thus, our Σ
7
are certain S
3
-bundles over S
4
.
All 4-ball bundles, or equivalently
R
4
-bundles, over S
4
are easy to describe:
each is determined by two numbers: the Euler number e, that is the self-intersection
index of S
4
⊂ Θ
8
, which assumes all integer values, and the Pontryagin number p
1
(i.e. the value of the Pontryagin class p
1
∈ H
4
(S
4
) on [S
4
] ∈ H
4
(S
4
)) which may
be an arbitrary even integer.
(Milnor explicitly construct his fibrations with maps of the 3-sphere into the
group SO
(4) of orientation preserving linear isometries of R
4
as follows. Decompose
S
4
into two round 4-balls, say S
4
= B
4
+
∪ B
4

with the common boundary S
3

=
B
4
+
∩ B
4

and let f
∶ s

↦ O

∈ SO(4) be a smooth map. Then glue the boundaries
of B
4
+
× R
4
and B
4

× R
4
by the diffeomorphism
(s

, s
) ↦ (s

, O

(s)) and obtain
V
8
= B
4
+
× R
4

f
B
4

× R
4
which makes an
R
4
-fibration over S
4
.
To construct a specific f , identify
R
4
with the quaternion line
H and S
3
with
the multiplicative group of quaternions of norm 1. Let f
(s) = f
ij
(s) ∈ SO(4) act by
x
↦ s
i
xs
j
for x
∈ H and the left and right quaternion multiplication. Then Milnor
computes: e
= i + j and p
1
= ±2(i − j).)
Obviously, all Σ
7
are 2-connected, but H
3

7
) may be non-zero (e.g. for the
trivial bundle). It is not hard to show that Σ
7
has the same homology as S
7
,
hence, homotopy equivalent to S
7
, if and only if e
= ±1 which means that the

116
MIKHAIL GROMOV
selfintersection index of the zero section sphere S
4
⊂ Θ
8
equals
±1; we stick to e = 1
for our candidates for Σ
7
.
The basic example of Σ
7
with e
= ±1 (the sign depends on the choice of the
orientation in Θ
8
) is the ordinary 7-sphere which comes with the Hopf fibration
S
7
→ S
4
, where this S
7
is positioned as the unit sphere in the quaternion plane
H
2
= R
8
, where it is freely acted upon by the group G
= S
3
of the unit quaternions
and where S
7
/G equals the sphere S
4
representing the quaternion projective line.
If Σ
7
is diffeomorphic to S
7
one can attach the 8-ball to Θ
8
along this S
7
-
boundary and obtain a smooth closed 8-manifold, say Θ
8
+
.
Milnor observes that the signature of Θ
8
+
equals
±1, since the homology of Θ
8
+
is
represented by a single cycle – the sphere S
4
⊂ Θ
8
⊂ Θ
8
+
the selfintersection number
of which equals the Euler number.
Then Milnor invokes the Thom signature theorem
45 sig
(X) + p
2
1
[X] = 7p
2
[X]
and concludes that the number 45
+p
2
1
must be divisible by 7; therefore, the bound-
aries Σ
7
of those Θ
8
which fail this condition, say for p
1
= 4, must be exotic. (You
do not have to know the definition of the Pontryagin classes, just remember they
are integer cohomology classes.)
Finally, using quaternions, Milnor explicitly constructs a Morse function Σ
7

R with only two critical points – maximum and minimum on each Σ
7
with e
= 1;
this yields the two ball decomposition. (We shall explain this in section 8.)
(Milnor’s topological arguments, which he presents with a meticulous care,
became a common knowledge and can be now found in any textbook; his lemmas
look apparent to a to-day topology student. The hardest for the modern reader
is the final Milnor’s lemma claiming that his function Σ
7
→ R is Morse with two
critical points. Milnor is laconic at this point: “It is easy to verify” is all what he
says.)
The 8-manifolds Θ
8
+
associated with Milnor’s exotic Σ
7
can be triangulated
with a single non-smooth point in such a triangulation. Yet, they admit no smooth
structures compatible with these triangulations since their combinatorial Pontrya-
gin numbers (defined by Rochlin-Schwartz and Thom) fail the divisibility condition
issuing from the Thom formula sig
(X
8
) = L
2
[X
8
]; in fact, they are not combina-
torially bordant to smooth manifolds.
Moreover, these Θ
8
+
are not even topologically bordant, and therefore, they are
non-homeomorphic to smooth manifolds by (slightly refined) Novikov’s topological
Pontryagin classes theorem.
The number of homotopy spheres, i.e. of mutually non-diffeomorphic manifolds
Σ
n
which are homotopy equivalent to S
n
is not that large. In fact, it is finite for
all n
≠ 4 by the work of Kervaire and Milnor [39], who, eventually, derive this from
the Serre finiteness theorem. (One knows now-a-days that every smooth homotopy
sphere Σ
n
is homeomorphic to S
n
according to the solution of the Poincar´
e conjec-
ture by Smale for n
≥ 5, by Freedman for n = 4 and by Perelman for n = 3, where
“homeomorphic”
⇒ “diffeomorphic” for n = 3 by Moise’s theorem.)
Kervaire and Milnor start by showing that for every homotopy sphere Σ
n
, there
exists a smooth map f
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
, N
>> n, such that the pullback f
−1
(s) ⊂ S
n
+N
of a generic point s
∈ S
N
is diffeomorphic to Σ
n
. (The existence of such an f with

MANIFOLDS
117
f
−1
(s) = Σ
n
is equivalent to the existence of an immersion Σ
n
→ R
n
+1
by the Hirsch
theorem.)
Then, by applying surgery (see section 9) to the f
0
-pullback of a point for a
given generic map f
0
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
, they prove that almost all homotopy classes of
maps S
n
+N
→ S
N
come from homotopy n-spheres. Namely:
● If n ≠ 4k + 2, then every homotopy class of maps S
n
+N
→ S
N
, N
>> n,
can be represented by a “Σ
n
-map” f , i.e. where the pullback of a generic
point is a homotopy sphere.
If n
= 4k + 2, then the homotopy classes of “Σ
n
-maps” constitute a subgroup in
the corresponding stable homotopy group, say K
n
⊂ π
st
n
= π
n
+N
(S
N
), N >> n,
that has index 1 or 2 and which is expressible in terms of the Kervaire-(Arf )
invariant classifying (similarly to the signature for n
= 4k) properly defined “self-
intersections” of
(k + 1)-cycles mod 2 in (4k + 2)-manifolds.
One knows today by the work of Pontryagin, Kervaire-Milnor and Barratt-
Jones-Mahowald see [9] that
● If n = 2, 6, 14, 30, 62, then the Kervaire invariant can be non-zero, i.e.
π
st
n
/K
n
= Z
2
.
Furthermore,
● The Kervaire invariant vanishes, i.e. K
n
= π
st
n
, for n
≠ 2, 6, 14, 30, 62, 126
(where it remains unknown if π
st
126
/K
126
equals
{0} or Z
2
).
In other words,
every continuous map S
n
+N
→ S
N
, N
>> n ≠ 2, 6, ..., 126, is
homotopic to a smooth map f
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
, such that the f -
pullback of a generic point is a homotopy n-sphere.
The case n
≠ 2
l
− 2 goes back to Browder (1969) and the case n = 2
l
− 2, l ≥ 8 is
a recent achievement by Hill, Hopkins and Ravenel [37]. (Their proof relies on a
generalized homology theory H
gen
n
where H
gen
n
+256
= H
gen
n
.)
If the pullback of a generic point of a smooth map f
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
, is dif-
feomorphic to S
n
, the map f may be non-contractible.
In fact, the set of the
homotopy classes of such f makes a cyclic subgroup in the stable homotopy group
of spheres, denoted J
n
⊂ π
st
n


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-and-93.html

the-scientific-and-98.html

the-scientific-novelty--.html

the-scottish-army-invaded.html

the-search-for-r-krishna-2.html